The Joy of Cooking Invasive Species - Modern Farmer

This is one of my favorite concepts in the convergence of biodiversity conservation and cooking — eating invasive species! Modern Farmer’s account of it is not only comprehensive but also enthusiastic. 

Siftah! You can only enjoy some things in season within a limited geography. This is the first time I had these sour plums for the last ten years that I’ve been in the States.  (at Nişantaşı) High-res

Siftah! You can only enjoy some things in season within a limited geography. This is the first time I had these sour plums for the last ten years that I’ve been in the States. (at Nişantaşı)

At the convergence of winter and spring, there are artichokes (enginar), nettles (isirgan otu), and watercress (tere) in Istanbul. I borrowed some sunchokes (yer elmasi) from the winter and put together this plate. 
I confit the artichoke in extra virgin olive oil with spices, as per a previous post. You basically heat the submerged artichokes on low heat without bringing the olive oil to a simmer. They take about thirty minutes to become melt in the mouth tender. 
The nettles are blanched, very conscientiously drained, and sauteed with five cloves of garlic confit (from the artichokes). Here is the ratio I worked with: Two bunches of nettles (picked and blanched) yield a fistful (~1/2 lb) of drained and chopped nettles. One cup of whole milk (reduced to half), two oz of sharp cheddar and a table spoon of butter is what I added to bring some richness to the plate. I started with one oz of cheese and doubled it after. Then I pulsed the mixture but left it well-textured. 
The sunchokes are roasted with thyme, butter, lots of salt and pepper. I worked with a 350F oven — but at this temp, you’ve got to toss and turn them fairly often. 
I won’t talk about the fillet. That’s easy. The sauce is pan drippings, reduced merlot and reduced veal stock. That’s it. Oh and the watercress is peppery, bright and awesome!  High-res

At the convergence of winter and spring, there are artichokes (enginar), nettles (isirgan otu), and watercress (tere) in Istanbul. I borrowed some sunchokes (yer elmasi) from the winter and put together this plate. 

I confit the artichoke in extra virgin olive oil with spices, as per a previous post. You basically heat the submerged artichokes on low heat without bringing the olive oil to a simmer. They take about thirty minutes to become melt in the mouth tender. 

The nettles are blanched, very conscientiously drained, and sauteed with five cloves of garlic confit (from the artichokes). Here is the ratio I worked with: Two bunches of nettles (picked and blanched) yield a fistful (~1/2 lb) of drained and chopped nettles. One cup of whole milk (reduced to half), two oz of sharp cheddar and a table spoon of butter is what I added to bring some richness to the plate. I started with one oz of cheese and doubled it after. Then I pulsed the mixture but left it well-textured. 

The sunchokes are roasted with thyme, butter, lots of salt and pepper. I worked with a 350F oven — but at this temp, you’ve got to toss and turn them fairly often. 

I won’t talk about the fillet. That’s easy. The sauce is pan drippings, reduced merlot and reduced veal stock. That’s it. Oh and the watercress is peppery, bright and awesome! 

Young apricots! Crispy, tart and refreshing! Season it with some seasalt or some chaat masala and pucker that face real good. Kayisi caglasi! #fruit #nofilter #spring #tart (at Kurtulus Caddesi) High-res

Young apricots! Crispy, tart and refreshing! Season it with some seasalt or some chaat masala and pucker that face real good. Kayisi caglasi! #fruit #nofilter #spring #tart (at Kurtulus Caddesi)

My surgeon told me to come in on an empty stomach. It sounds like breakfast is on him!

Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

There was no breakfast. Nor had the inflammation formed abscess. So, we waited for another two days. Then there was another hungry morning yesterday and they took me in for a 15 minute operation. 

Well, the anasthesiologist has explained to me before my dose that her daughter went to the same high school as me (I’m in Istanbul btw.) and that she was coming to Swarthmore on a full ride. He started barraging me with logistical questions until I fell asleep and continued where we left off when I awoke. 

In the meanwhile, a pint of puss was removed from my arm and I no longer had a fever. 

I had to postpone my return date to the Culinary Instititute of America, however, which is only terrible because I would have loved to return to the same class I was with before my great externship at Blue Hill at Stone Barns… 

This chicken doner will sell in a matter of five hours. 70 kg of meat, 50 g per sandwich, 2 l or 90 cents per sandwich. Thats some $1250 right there. At a margin of maybe 25%, that’s 300+. They make 20 cents on average per drink. Only half the people buy drinks, adding up to some $280. We’re already upwards of 550 in five hours. And this is why I work so hard to become a chef (!) (at Dürümcü Çeto) High-res

This chicken doner will sell in a matter of five hours. 70 kg of meat, 50 g per sandwich, 2 l or 90 cents per sandwich. Thats some $1250 right there. At a margin of maybe 25%, that’s 300+. They make 20 cents on average per drink. Only half the people buy drinks, adding up to some $280. We’re already upwards of 550 in five hours. And this is why I work so hard to become a chef (!) (at Dürümcü Çeto)