I had the privilege of working with these 7 lb monsters, minokopi or umbrine fish (Umbrina cirrhosa). What an amazing flavor and texture. As an angler fish, this is a relatively exotic product that has apparently become more commonplace in Istanbul. Reminiscent of the Mediterranean turbot, the flavor is mildly fishy — it has large flakes and an excellent succulent texture. 
I served this with a potato dauphinoise and simply pan fried it with a rice flour / AP flour dusting. The first course was legendary. A three wheat (freekeh, spelt, and kamut) risotto with Romano beans and Mediterranean shrimp cooked in a fennel and shrimp stock, finished with tallegio and lemon zest!  High-res

I had the privilege of working with these 7 lb monsters, minokopi or umbrine fish (Umbrina cirrhosa). What an amazing flavor and texture. As an angler fish, this is a relatively exotic product that has apparently become more commonplace in Istanbul. Reminiscent of the Mediterranean turbot, the flavor is mildly fishy — it has large flakes and an excellent succulent texture. 

I served this with a potato dauphinoise and simply pan fried it with a rice flour / AP flour dusting. The first course was legendary. A three wheat (freekeh, spelt, and kamut) risotto with Romano beans and Mediterranean shrimp cooked in a fennel and shrimp stock, finished with tallegio and lemon zest! 

Home is where you enjoy your mother’s cooking! 
I’m back in Istanbul for a quick break — I have trails at some great restaurants in the city and I’m going to be meeting a couple really cool food-people for the first time this week! 
This has turned into a sort of a tradition now. Ground beef stuffed crispy boreks with Greek yogurt, and a ouzo-tomato sauce. That, my friends, is my comfort food!  High-res

Home is where you enjoy your mother’s cooking! 

I’m back in Istanbul for a quick break — I have trails at some great restaurants in the city and I’m going to be meeting a couple really cool food-people for the first time this week! 

This has turned into a sort of a tradition now. Ground beef stuffed crispy boreks with Greek yogurt, and a ouzo-tomato sauce. That, my friends, is my comfort food! 

Ive always been interested in the idea of foraging. Ive been an inner city person my whole life and the idea of finding amazing things in nature to sustain ourselves off of seems to be a refreshingly new take on grocery shopping haha! For someone like me who lives in the inner city of Boston on the east coast, how would you recommend I start out?

Asked by Anonymous

That’s one of the most exciting questions I’ve heard in a while!

Well, your backyard (i.e. NH, ME) provides amazing coastal, riparian as well as sylvan foraging!

However, I think the more surprising place to start is your local parks!

It’s been a while since I’ve been to Boston but strolling in San Fransisco, Istanbul and NYC, in the last year across local parks, I’ve run into such things as wild chives / scallions, ramps, dandelions, fennel, wild carrots, day lilies, some species of cress…

There are also a lot of things that will require a little bit more processing but are ubiquitous in season and delicious when treated right: Cattails, acorns, black walnuts, etc. 

Mushrooms are definitely a more advanced pursuit — other than the easily identifiable morel. One of my favorite starter mushrooms (which if you’re lucky you’ll run into in parks as well) is the dryad’s saddle

Oh and garlic mustard is great too! 

If you want to go a little criminal you could also venture into your neighbor’s flower patch and look for things like nasturtium or bee balm

Man — you’re going to have sooo much fun! 

Extra hot sopprasetta, home-pickled beets, homemade focaccia, homemade meyer lemon-tomato-caper-green peppercorn relish, gorgonzola forte High-res

Extra hot sopprasetta, home-pickled beets, homemade focaccia, homemade meyer lemon-tomato-caper-green peppercorn relish, gorgonzola forte

Thai summer rolls in Bibb lettuce Thai summer rolls in Bibb lettuce

Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

sayattheexplorer:

Summer rolls in Bibb lettuce

Rice noodles, shrimp, avocados, cucumbers and tomatoes

Sauce with four tbsp of yuzu, one tbsp of soy sauce, quarter of a preserved lemon - diced, 5 Thai chilis fine sliced, one tbsp of brown sugar

This was one of the first posts on my blog! It’s been almost two years! God, the cilantro is so squished, I feel ashamed for how dull my knife must have been! 

(via lasoupedujourestlight)

Source sayattheexplorer

Poached, salt-crusted and baked, roasted, grilled pears

After years of unrelenting enthusiasm for the idea of it, I think I’m ready to admit that any procedure that draws the moisture out of pears to make the cellulose-rich stone cells more prominent is doomed for sub-optimal results. Such attempts are blatantly misguided by the ease to infuse pears with flavored liquids and the very short and arbitrary window of time during which the pear’s osmotic balances allow for a more succulent texture. 

Moving on to revisit later… 

Or I could ask you folks which varietals of pears have the least stone cells? One I can think of is the Akca pear from Ankara (Tr. Akca armudu).