Silken tofu and pea couscous with quail eggs, asparagus and pickled fiddle heads #conceptualexperiment #asparagus #spring #farm #quail #fiddleheads #breakfast #healthy #vegeterian #impromptu #tofu #perspective
Couscous: Pour boiling, seasoned water over the couscous. Let steep until al dente, strain, chill, set aside. 
Quail eggs: Add to boiling water, take out at minute 4, chill, set aside. 
Pickled fiddle heads: Forage, clean, trim and pickle for three days at room temp in a 1 cup water, 2 cup vinegar, 1/2 cup sugar, 2 T salt brine. I used a lot of mustard seeds they really come through in the back ground and are really complimentary in this dish. Use two T. I also used two star anise, one stick of cinnamon, fennel seeds, black peppercorns and black cumin seeds. Also this is for about 3/4 lb of fiddle heads. 
Silken tofu and pea puree: Break 1 C of silken tofu into small pieces incorporate in a blender with 1 C of peas. Add soy milk to adjust consistency, season with salt and the pickle brine from the fiddle heads. I made the consistency into a thick smoothie.
High-res

Silken tofu and pea couscous with quail eggs, asparagus and pickled fiddle heads #conceptualexperiment #asparagus #spring #farm #quail #fiddleheads #breakfast #healthy #vegeterian #impromptu #tofu #perspective

  • Couscous: Pour boiling, seasoned water over the couscous. Let steep until al dente, strain, chill, set aside. 
  • Quail eggs: Add to boiling water, take out at minute 4, chill, set aside. 
  • Pickled fiddle heads: Forage, clean, trim and pickle for three days at room temp in a 1 cup water, 2 cup vinegar, 1/2 cup sugar, 2 T salt brine. I used a lot of mustard seeds they really come through in the back ground and are really complimentary in this dish. Use two T. I also used two star anise, one stick of cinnamon, fennel seeds, black peppercorns and black cumin seeds. Also this is for about 3/4 lb of fiddle heads. 
  • Silken tofu and pea puree: Break 1 C of silken tofu into small pieces incorporate in a blender with 1 C of peas. Add soy milk to adjust consistency, season with salt and the pickle brine from the fiddle heads. I made the consistency into a thick smoothie.
sayattheexplorer:

Monkfish (tr: fener) cooked in brown butter with Aleppo peppers with a glass noodle salad
For the glass noodle salad, I sauteed mushrooms and finished them with sliced garlic. I had fennel shoots, carrots, cilantro shoots and celery stalks at my disposal — so, I sliced them all really thin. Then I toasted some sesame seeds and combined them with the glass noodles, the vegetables, fish sauce, bonito soy sauce, and some sesame oil to taste. Then I squeezed a good amount of charred lime on top. I also incorporated a little bit of Aleppo peppers into the cold salad. I wanted a little bit of a kick.
The fish was cooked medium with a crust outside on a skillet in brown butter. After I got the right texture on all sides, I just finished the fish with a little bit of Aleppo and soy sauce. The texture is like lobster, the flavor is like no other. I love monk fish. 
Then I ate it. 

Guess what’s for breakfast!  High-res

Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

sayattheexplorer:

Monkfish (tr: fener) cooked in brown butter with Aleppo peppers with a glass noodle salad

For the glass noodle salad, I sauteed mushrooms and finished them with sliced garlic. I had fennel shoots, carrots, cilantro shoots and celery stalks at my disposal — so, I sliced them all really thin. Then I toasted some sesame seeds and combined them with the glass noodles, the vegetables, fish sauce, bonito soy sauce, and some sesame oil to taste. Then I squeezed a good amount of charred lime on top. I also incorporated a little bit of Aleppo peppers into the cold salad. I wanted a little bit of a kick.

The fish was cooked medium with a crust outside on a skillet in brown butter. After I got the right texture on all sides, I just finished the fish with a little bit of Aleppo and soy sauce. The texture is like lobster, the flavor is like no other. I love monk fish. 

Then I ate it. 

Guess what’s for breakfast! 

Açma is an interesting phenomenon as a Turkish breakfast staple. 
It’s only consumed fresh. It feels like a flaky brioche, sweet, soft and luscious. 
The flaky texture is great but the traditional product is essentially a soft ball of baked dough while I’m all about crust! So, I make baked grilled cheeses low and slow to form a thick crust on these flaky buns! This is where I end up!  High-res

Açma is an interesting phenomenon as a Turkish breakfast staple.

It’s only consumed fresh. It feels like a flaky brioche, sweet, soft and luscious.

The flaky texture is great but the traditional product is essentially a soft ball of baked dough while I’m all about crust! So, I make baked grilled cheeses low and slow to form a thick crust on these flaky buns! This is where I end up! 

sayattheexplorer:

I had my first banh mi at Guy’s American Kitchen off of Times Square — what an underwhelming experience that was. The baguette was dense and stale with no crunch and completely cold. The mayonaisse was superfluous and the fries that the sandwich was served with were soggy. It was so underwhelming that the experience stayed with me after three months. 
The banh mi experience is very different in Little Saigon in San Fransisco. I had the early bird advantage this morning. I was at the shop on Larkin by 7:45 when the bread was crunchy and toasty, and the carrots, cilantro and hot green chilis were fresh. 
I tried two sandwiches. One with pate and another one a combination of fancy pork and roasted pork. The banh mi sauce brought the whole sandwich quietly rather than being on the front, which I find is the case with some banh mi. 
When you make a simple sandwich such as banh mi, it’s always about the freshest ingredients and not about superfluous bells and whistles you put on the sandwich. 
Jack fruit chips are available at the counter! 
Little Saigon, San Fransisco

I could kill for a banh mi right now! High-res

Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

sayattheexplorer:

I had my first banh mi at Guy’s American Kitchen off of Times Square — what an underwhelming experience that was. The baguette was dense and stale with no crunch and completely cold. The mayonaisse was superfluous and the fries that the sandwich was served with were soggy. It was so underwhelming that the experience stayed with me after three months. 

The banh mi experience is very different in Little Saigon in San Fransisco. I had the early bird advantage this morning. I was at the shop on Larkin by 7:45 when the bread was crunchy and toasty, and the carrots, cilantro and hot green chilis were fresh. 

I tried two sandwiches. One with pate and another one a combination of fancy pork and roasted pork. The banh mi sauce brought the whole sandwich quietly rather than being on the front, which I find is the case with some banh mi. 

When you make a simple sandwich such as banh mi, it’s always about the freshest ingredients and not about superfluous bells and whistles you put on the sandwich. 

Jack fruit chips are available at the counter! 

Little Saigon, San Fransisco

I could kill for a banh mi right now!