Project plan!

I had this idea for a plate that combined some Persian flavors (pistachios, rosewater, lime) with Indian flavors (kasturi methi, cumin, coriander, smoky mustard seeds, green chilis). This is a lot to read but I’m looking for feedback and perspective: 

Plating:

1- Into a circle mold place the potatoes

2- Lean the charred chicken on the potato (try slicing and fanning)

3- Drop two chutneys in circles around the plate

4- Crack brittle and spread one T over the plate

 

Tomato chutney:

  • 1 T mustard oil
  • 1 T black mustard seeds
  • 1 t turmeric
  • 3 T fine diced shallot
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 t ginger
  • 8 oz diced tomatoes

 

1- Toast mustard seeds until they start popping and become smoky. Reserve to incorporate later.

2- In 1 T of mustard oil (sub: butter or veg oil), sweat the garlic on medium to high heat. Add the turmeric, the shallots and ginger when the garlic becomes fragrant, add the tomatoes when the garlic browns.

3- Crush the tomatoes, add the toasted mustard seeds and simmer for 10 minutes. Adjust seasoning with fine sea salt. Let cool and use at room temperature.

Note: Use next day for better flavor.

Green chili chutney with peas:

  • 3 T diced white onion (sweated without fat)
  • 2 cloves of garlic sliced
  • 4 oz peas (blanched)
  • 12 green Indian chilies, no stem
  • 2 C chopped cilantro leaves
  • Lime juice and sea salt to taste

 

1- Incorporate in blender and puree until smooth. Add water to adjust consistency. It should be runny akin to a smoothie.

Curried potatoes:

  • 4 large Idaho potatoes
  • 1 T dried fenugreek (or 2 cups of fresh leaves)
  • 2 T butter
  • 3 T diced onion
  • 6 cloves of garlic, sliced
  • 2 t ginger minced
  • ½ T turmeric
  • 3/4 T cumin seeds
  • 1 t allspice
  • 1 t cinnamon
  • 1 t cardamom seeds
  • ½ T Kashmiri chili powder
  • Optional: Curry leaves

 

1- Peel, chop and simmer the potatoes until cooked 2/3 of the way. Strain and set aside.

2- Toast the dried fenugreek in a nonstick sautoir until fragrant. Add half the butter to the pan and sweat the onions on low heat (add fenugreek leaves at this time if you’re using fresh ones). Add the garlic and ginger and sweat lightly. Add all the spices and warm and strained potatoes to the sautoir.

3- Saute potatoes until the potato chunks are coated with all the seasonings. Season to taste with fine sea salt.

Charred chicken thigh roulades w/ coconut, rosewater, Marash peppers and lime zest

  • 4 deboned chicken thighs (butterfly meat further to get to an even cut if necessary)
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • Zest and juice of one lime
  • 2 T rosewater
  • 2 t Marash pepper

 

1- Ground Marash peppers either on a cutting board with a knife or in a mortar to get more of the color out into the coconut milk. Incorporate all the ingredients and marinade the chicken overnight.

2- Take chicken out and dry completely. Season with fine sea salt and lightly with fresh ground white pepper on both sides. Lay each thigh on a sheet of plastic wrap and wrap tight to mold into shape.

3- Place in the refrigerator. Take out and place in an oven preheated to 3000C on a cast iron skillet. Take out in 30 minutes.

4- Brush with butter or lard and finish under a broiler until the surface is charred.

Pistachio, fennel and cumin brittle:

http://www.foodnetwork.ca/recipe/spiced-brittle/12938/

 

 

Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

sayattheexplorer:

The Goubert Food Market at the heart of Pondicherry is complete with a fish market, a meat and poultry market, a coffee roaster, flower shops, vegetable and fruit vendors and much more! The produce is diverse with banana shoots and flowers, chayote squash from South America (my favorite squash), southern gourds, pumpkins, yams, and more… 

You know how some get excited when they see a kitten, that’s how I feel when I see these eggplants! They’re just gorgeous! 

Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

sayattheexplorer:

I’ve always believed that if I visit a food market in a foreign country, I should just keep biting into things.

This theory brought me across these little morsels this time around. They’re used in fish curries. The black seeds inside have a pungent peppery taste and the rind is lemony, perhaps more intense than preserved lemons. It’s called Vibhitaki and is part of the ayurvedic triphala.

I would love to see how it does when cooked! 

So, I’ve been going after Szechuan peppercorns for the last couple of days, researching ways of using them, trying to incorporate them into my repertoire. As a spice fanatic, I have one source that I always rely upon and my source is telling my that these crazy, lemony, tongue-numbing triphala that I found in Mapusa, India are related to Szechuan peppercorns — same genus. Too bad I can’t find the bag of triphala that I bought from there. I’ve been moving around so much that it looks like it got lost in the process. 

I mentioned I was doing a catering gig for Christmas. This is the opening course. Ragda patties with raita, green chutney, and persimmon and pomegranate chutney.. 
The patties were made with potatoes, homemade paneer and spices (Kashmiri chili powder, whole cumin, fresh herbs, and others). My raita had pickled red onions, cucumbers and lemon zest. The green chutney was mainly Indian green chilies, cilantro, and lime juice. The persimmon chutney had persimmons, pomegranates, and lime juice! 

I mentioned I was doing a catering gig for Christmas. This is the opening course. Ragda patties with raita, green chutney, and persimmon and pomegranate chutney.. 

The patties were made with potatoes, homemade paneer and spices (Kashmiri chili powder, whole cumin, fresh herbs, and others). My raita had pickled red onions, cucumbers and lemon zest. The green chutney was mainly Indian green chilies, cilantro, and lime juice. The persimmon chutney had persimmons, pomegranates, and lime juice! 

Scalded milk chips dusted with caramel and sea salt? Wait, what? Did I just come up with that? 
I just burn the bottom of my paneer pot and didn’t scrape it until I took out the whey and the curds. The curds, I turned into paneer, the whey I used in my palak broth, and the scalded bottom, I used to make this crazy thing! 
I poured hot milk over the scalded bottom and scraped it gently in large sheets once it loosened. Then I put it on a plate and let it “dehydrate” overnight. 
I had some caramel sugar crystals — I ran them through my spice grinder with a little bit of sea salt. I seasoned the chips. And I ate them. I think it actually works.  High-res

Scalded milk chips dusted with caramel and sea salt? Wait, what? Did I just come up with that? 

I just burn the bottom of my paneer pot and didn’t scrape it until I took out the whey and the curds. The curds, I turned into paneer, the whey I used in my palak broth, and the scalded bottom, I used to make this crazy thing! 

I poured hot milk over the scalded bottom and scraped it gently in large sheets once it loosened. Then I put it on a plate and let it “dehydrate” overnight. 

I had some caramel sugar crystals — I ran them through my spice grinder with a little bit of sea salt. I seasoned the chips. And I ate them. I think it actually works. 

Black lentil dal with homemade paneer, toasted papad, lime and amla pickles, jeera and mint rice, veg entre of the day (at Culinary Institute Of America). My teammate and myself whipped this up in 45 minutes. Papad and the pickles are store bought. Papad was roasted on the grill. 
We reserved the whey from the paneer and made a vegetable stock with it. Cooked the lentils in the whey — gave it a tangy profile. We used South Indian spices in this dal, though we used urad dal. Curry leaves, kasthuri methi, jeera, mustard seeds, ajwain, mirch, coriander, turmeric and garlic / ginger / onions. 
We deep fried the paneer for color and texture, and seasoned it before adding to the lentils. 
The rice was cooked in a vegetable stock and finished with butter, toasted cumin, cilantro and mint. 
It was a good day!  High-res

Black lentil dal with homemade paneer, toasted papad, lime and amla pickles, jeera and mint rice, veg entre of the day (at Culinary Institute Of America). My teammate and myself whipped this up in 45 minutes. Papad and the pickles are store bought. Papad was roasted on the grill. 

We reserved the whey from the paneer and made a vegetable stock with it. Cooked the lentils in the whey — gave it a tangy profile. We used South Indian spices in this dal, though we used urad dal. Curry leaves, kasthuri methi, jeera, mustard seeds, ajwain, mirch, coriander, turmeric and garlic / ginger / onions. 

We deep fried the paneer for color and texture, and seasoned it before adding to the lentils. 

The rice was cooked in a vegetable stock and finished with butter, toasted cumin, cilantro and mint. 

It was a good day! 

Tawa pulao — Indian vegetable fried rice. That cast iron griddle is a tawa. Tawa pulao is not very common in Mumbai but it’s fun to indulge when you do run into it. This is essentially a stir fried rice. Pulaos come from the Middle East… and they go right in your tummy! 
Near Crawford Market, Mumbai, India High-res

Tawa pulao — Indian vegetable fried rice. That cast iron griddle is a tawa. Tawa pulao is not very common in Mumbai but it’s fun to indulge when you do run into it. This is essentially a stir fried rice. Pulaos come from the Middle East… and they go right in your tummy! 

Near Crawford Market, Mumbai, India

Olympia is an iconic joint for Mumbaikar. At breakfast they serve the famous keema, a minced mutton fry with vatana or green peas and masala that is spiked with green chilis and whole spices. It’s served with white bread usually. 
I like mine on a two egg omellete with chapati. It was my favorite breakfast during my tandoor days in Mumbai. Also, if you get lucky, you’ll coincide with buffalo milk chai. They don’t have this all the time but when they do, it’s a delight.
Olympia, Colaba, Mumbai High-res

Olympia is an iconic joint for Mumbaikar. At breakfast they serve the famous keema, a minced mutton fry with vatana or green peas and masala that is spiked with green chilis and whole spices. It’s served with white bread usually. 

I like mine on a two egg omellete with chapati. It was my favorite breakfast during my tandoor days in Mumbai. Also, if you get lucky, you’ll coincide with buffalo milk chai. They don’t have this all the time but when they do, it’s a delight.

Olympia, Colaba, Mumbai

India’s cooks are true masters of garnishes lending textural contrast as well as fresh flavors, color, shine and kick to already excellent dishes….
Clockwise from the upper left: Fried papad or lentil crackers, spicy lemon pickle, bindhi Jaipuri or spicy deep fried Indian okra, mint and cucumber juice, mattar or pea pulao with crispy onions and coriander, gobi khadi pakoda — deep fried cauliflower in rich yogurt broth, subz makhni — vegetables braised in a tomato sauce thickened with cashews
Arthithi Hotel, Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu High-res

India’s cooks are true masters of garnishes lending textural contrast as well as fresh flavors, color, shine and kick to already excellent dishes….

Clockwise from the upper left: Fried papad or lentil crackers, spicy lemon pickle, bindhi Jaipuri or spicy deep fried Indian okra, mint and cucumber juice, mattar or pea pulao with crispy onions and coriander, gobi khadi pakoda — deep fried cauliflower in rich yogurt broth, subz makhni — vegetables braised in a tomato sauce thickened with cashews

Arthithi Hotel, Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu

Chicken tikka three ways  — three classic flavors familiar from my tandoori days in Mumbai: Creamy saffron, tandoori chicken, and green chicken! 
The details on this dish were excellent. The trio was certainly cooked very consciously. Only the yogurt marinated tandoori chicken has strong enough of a flavor to stand up to a decent char and there you have it, it has an excellent amount. Each piece was tender and well cooked. The haara (green) chicken had a garlic and green chili forward flavor with a sweet coriander balancing the whole thing. Classic combination! 
My chardonnay from Bourgogne was the first glass of wine I had in two months!
This was at one of my favorite restaurants so far in India. The Dupleix in Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu High-res

Chicken tikka three ways — three classic flavors familiar from my tandoori days in Mumbai: Creamy saffron, tandoori chicken, and green chicken! 

The details on this dish were excellent. The trio was certainly cooked very consciously. Only the yogurt marinated tandoori chicken has strong enough of a flavor to stand up to a decent char and there you have it, it has an excellent amount. Each piece was tender and well cooked. The haara (green) chicken had a garlic and green chili forward flavor with a sweet coriander balancing the whole thing. Classic combination! 

My chardonnay from Bourgogne was the first glass of wine I had in two months!

This was at one of my favorite restaurants so far in India. The Dupleix in Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu

The ominous planet on my plate is technically a poori / puri: A puffed balloon of a bread! This giant version is called a bhatoora / bature. It’s originally from Punjab but orbited down South. The chole (spiced chickpeas) was a classic southern chickpea fry with sweet spices, tomatoes, cashews and coconut. 
Again the fun factor is on the front. When you pierce this thing the first time, a cloud of steam emerges. You’ve gotta watch out! 
Surguru Spot, Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu High-res

The ominous planet on my plate is technically a poori / puri: A puffed balloon of a bread! This giant version is called a bhatoora / bature. It’s originally from Punjab but orbited down South. The chole (spiced chickpeas) was a classic southern chickpea fry with sweet spices, tomatoes, cashews and coconut. 

Again the fun factor is on the front. When you pierce this thing the first time, a cloud of steam emerges. You’ve gotta watch out! 

Surguru Spot, Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu