Red mullets Mediterranean shrimp Akya -- the versatile leer fish. 20 lb giants. Here are cuddle fish tainted by their own ink Needle fish. It's great shape lends itself for creative preparations. John Dory and Muhammad's thumbprint. It's actually an adaption to confuse prey by emulating the look of a larger eye. Beautiful turbot One of the alrgest monk fish I've ever seen. The other side of the fish is too ugly to display. Well, not really, but the bottom is more easily damaged. Oysters and scallops

Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

sayattheexplorer:

It’s red mullet season in Istanbul and these respectable fish in the first photo were so bright and beautiful that I thought I was snorkeling right next to them. I went to the Istanbul fish market (wholesale market in Yenikapi) for the first time this week.

On my explorations in India and Thailand, I followed a simple formula to get the most out of the local food culture. 

  1. Read about the cuisine
  2. Visit markets; understand the season, the land and the bounty. 
  3. Eat street food wherever you see it
  4. Eat where the ”people” eat
  5. Eat at fine dining establishments
  6. Read about the cuisine

I found that the second step is undisputably the most essential one. I always helped my mother with her shopping growing up but I had not paid a visit to the markets with a trained eye. 

I absolutely loved the Balik Hali (the wholesale fish market) in Yenikapi!

I parted from good friends at about midnight after a good (not great) dinner at Karakoy Lokantasi (a respectable establishment) and hookah in Tophane. I walked up to Taksim and walked the Red streets of Istiklal until about 1 AM. There is always something happening there and it’s always interesting to talk to the people on the street. 

I got a haircut and a straight razor shave and hopped into the shuttle right after — yes, you can get a haircut in Istanbul at 1 AM. I missed the point where I had to get off and walked back about six miles. Amazing walk by the water, half of it in the rain, listening to NPR’s The Splendid Table. 

Well, I got to the Balik Hali at about 2:30 AM. It was buzzing with excitement. Almost literally. Instead of bees they had seagulls flocking all around in an unobtrusive way, waiting their turn at the pick. 

Boats were loading off their catch, fishermen were setting up their humble displays of not so humble fish, and procurement specialists were lining up around the displays. Cuddlefish (calamari), sand sharks, monk fish (Tr: Fener), mullets, leer fish (akya), turbot, John Dory (Tr: Dulger), scallops. needlefish (Tr: Zargana)… What a beautiful scene. 

The market buzzed for about two hours after 2:30 and then it led to a calmness. Everyone was tired and ready for bed, including myself. 

I had great educational conversations — especially the one about Muhammad’s thumbprint on John Dory. Very entertaining. And convincing. 

A most successful reconnaissance mission! Also, I think fish are the most beautiful of all proteins. There, I said it! 

sayattheexplorer:

I was playing with fava beans, then I made this: Green fava hummus with dill, pistachios and fruity extra virgin olive oil. 
Ingredients: 
1/2 lb of peeled fava beans
2 T extra virgin olive oil (fruity preferred)
1 T peeled chopped pistachios
2 T picked and chopped dill or mint
1 T picked parsley
3 cloves roasted or confit garlic (sub 1 clove minced garlic)
1-2 oz lemon juice (to taste)
sea salt and fresh ground white pepper to taste






 Instructions:
 Blanch fava beans for one minute in seasoned water, shock in ice bath immediately
Combine beans, garlic, half of the lemon juice, pistachios and herbs, and incorporate in a blender
Season lightly with salt and pepper, and on low speed emulsify the extra virgin olive oil into the mixture
Finish seasoning with the remaining lemon juice, and salt and fresh ground white pepper

 Note: You can adjust consistency with additional olive oil or water High-res

Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

sayattheexplorer:

I was playing with fava beans, then I made this: Green fava hummus with dill, pistachios and fruity extra virgin olive oil. 

Ingredients: 

  • 1/2 lb of peeled fava beans
  • 2 T extra virgin olive oil (fruity preferred)
  • 1 T peeled chopped pistachios
  • 2 T picked and chopped dill or mint
  • 1 T picked parsley
  • 3 cloves roasted or confit garlic (sub 1 clove minced garlic)
  • 1-2 oz lemon juice (to taste)
  • sea salt and fresh ground white pepper to taste

 Instructions:

  1.  Blanch fava beans for one minute in seasoned water, shock in ice bath immediately
  2. Combine beans, garlic, half of the lemon juice, pistachios and herbs, and incorporate in a blender
  3. Season lightly with salt and pepper, and on low speed emulsify the extra virgin olive oil into the mixture
  4. Finish seasoning with the remaining lemon juice, and salt and fresh ground white pepper

 Note: You can adjust consistency with additional olive oil or water

I was playing with fava beans, then I made this: Green fava hummus with dill, pistachios and fruity extra virgin olive oil. 
Ingredients: 
1/2 lb of peeled fava beans
2 T extra virgin olive oil (fruity preferred)
1 T peeled chopped pistachios
2 T picked and chopped dill or mint
1 T picked parsley
3 cloves roasted or confit garlic (sub 1 clove minced garlic)
1-2 oz lemon juice (to taste)
sea salt and fresh ground white pepper to taste







 Instructions:
 Blanch fava beans for one minute in seasoned water, shock in ice bath immediately
Combine beans, garlic, half of the lemon juice, pistachios and herbs, and incorporate in a blender
Season lightly with salt and pepper, and on low speed emulsify the extra virgin olive oil into the mixture
Finish seasoning with the remaining lemon juice, and salt and fresh ground white pepper


 Note: You can adjust consistency with additional olive oil or water High-res

I was playing with fava beans, then I made this: Green fava hummus with dill, pistachios and fruity extra virgin olive oil. 

Ingredients: 

  • 1/2 lb of peeled fava beans
  • 2 T extra virgin olive oil (fruity preferred)
  • 1 T peeled chopped pistachios
  • 2 T picked and chopped dill or mint
  • 1 T picked parsley
  • 3 cloves roasted or confit garlic (sub 1 clove minced garlic)
  • 1-2 oz lemon juice (to taste)
  • sea salt and fresh ground white pepper to taste

 Instructions:

  1.  Blanch fava beans for one minute in seasoned water, shock in ice bath immediately
  2. Combine beans, garlic, half of the lemon juice, pistachios and herbs, and incorporate in a blender
  3. Season lightly with salt and pepper, and on low speed emulsify the extra virgin olive oil into the mixture
  4. Finish seasoning with the remaining lemon juice, and salt and fresh ground white pepper

 Note: You can adjust consistency with additional olive oil or water

At the convergence of winter and spring, there are artichokes (enginar), nettles (isirgan otu), and watercress (tere) in Istanbul. I borrowed some sunchokes (yer elmasi) from the winter and put together this plate. 
I confit the artichoke in extra virgin olive oil with spices, as per a previous post. You basically heat the submerged artichokes on low heat without bringing the olive oil to a simmer. They take about thirty minutes to become melt in the mouth tender. 
The nettles are blanched, very conscientiously drained, and sauteed with five cloves of garlic confit (from the artichokes). Here is the ratio I worked with: Two bunches of nettles (picked and blanched) yield a fistful (~1/2 lb) of drained and chopped nettles. One cup of whole milk (reduced to half), two oz of sharp cheddar and a table spoon of butter is what I added to bring some richness to the plate. I started with one oz of cheese and doubled it after. Then I pulsed the mixture but left it well-textured. 
The sunchokes are roasted with thyme, butter, lots of salt and pepper. I worked with a 350F oven — but at this temp, you’ve got to toss and turn them fairly often. 
I won’t talk about the fillet. That’s easy. The sauce is pan drippings, reduced merlot and reduced veal stock. That’s it. Oh and the watercress is peppery, bright and awesome!  High-res

At the convergence of winter and spring, there are artichokes (enginar), nettles (isirgan otu), and watercress (tere) in Istanbul. I borrowed some sunchokes (yer elmasi) from the winter and put together this plate. 

I confit the artichoke in extra virgin olive oil with spices, as per a previous post. You basically heat the submerged artichokes on low heat without bringing the olive oil to a simmer. They take about thirty minutes to become melt in the mouth tender. 

The nettles are blanched, very conscientiously drained, and sauteed with five cloves of garlic confit (from the artichokes). Here is the ratio I worked with: Two bunches of nettles (picked and blanched) yield a fistful (~1/2 lb) of drained and chopped nettles. One cup of whole milk (reduced to half), two oz of sharp cheddar and a table spoon of butter is what I added to bring some richness to the plate. I started with one oz of cheese and doubled it after. Then I pulsed the mixture but left it well-textured. 

The sunchokes are roasted with thyme, butter, lots of salt and pepper. I worked with a 350F oven — but at this temp, you’ve got to toss and turn them fairly often. 

I won’t talk about the fillet. That’s easy. The sauce is pan drippings, reduced merlot and reduced veal stock. That’s it. Oh and the watercress is peppery, bright and awesome! 

Home is where you enjoy your mother’s cooking! 
I’m back in Istanbul for a quick break — I have trails at some great restaurants in the city and I’m going to be meeting a couple really cool food-people for the first time this week! 
This has turned into a sort of a tradition now. Ground beef stuffed crispy boreks with Greek yogurt, and a ouzo-tomato sauce. That, my friends, is my comfort food!  High-res

Home is where you enjoy your mother’s cooking! 

I’m back in Istanbul for a quick break — I have trails at some great restaurants in the city and I’m going to be meeting a couple really cool food-people for the first time this week! 

This has turned into a sort of a tradition now. Ground beef stuffed crispy boreks with Greek yogurt, and a ouzo-tomato sauce. That, my friends, is my comfort food! 

To elevate a food culture, you need to honor your artisans, craftsmen and farmers.

Here is an article from the WSJ. Though I’m taken aback by some of the analogies (Mehmet Gurs / Ferran Adria) or the lack of respect for artisans in the brief note on ”cheese from crappy huts”, it’s nevertheless an interesting article. I think to elevate a food culture, you need to elevate your artisans, craftsmen and farmers rather than building holding companies that stretch your attention across multiple companies. It just doesn’t sound convincing, having said that I do admit that I’m not as knowledgeable about what’s going on in Istanbul as I should be. What do others think?

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304906704579115561665549816

I am cooking as a Private Chef for Christmas — I conjured up a fantastic menu mostly inspired by my time on the line in Mumbai. I made a shopping list, checked it twice and went to the market. I’m making some paneer — but right next to the whole milk on a random shelf I saw Istanbul flavors staring at me. Armenian Basturma and Bulgarian Sheep’s Milk Kashkaval. 
I got goosebumps immediately, homesick and hungry at the same time. 
Kashkaval has a somewhat grassy (almost bitter similar to dandelion greens) and nutty flavor. I find that it’s somewhere between pecorino romano and caciocavallo, though it’s described as a derivative of the latter. And basturma is essentially dry cured beef with a fenugreek, garlic, paprika and cumin rub. 
So, I picked up a tremendous saison beer to go along with it. I made a grilled cheese, fried some eggs, and put on David Chang’s PBS show. 
I’ve determined the only thing that can distract me from cooking is cooking something else. I guess I’ll have to prep for my gig tomorrow.

High-res

I am cooking as a Private Chef for Christmas — I conjured up a fantastic menu mostly inspired by my time on the line in Mumbai. I made a shopping list, checked it twice and went to the market. I’m making some paneer — but right next to the whole milk on a random shelf I saw Istanbul flavors staring at me. Armenian Basturma and Bulgarian Sheep’s Milk Kashkaval. 

I got goosebumps immediately, homesick and hungry at the same time. 

Kashkaval has a somewhat grassy (almost bitter similar to dandelion greens) and nutty flavor. I find that it’s somewhere between pecorino romano and caciocavallo, though it’s described as a derivative of the latter. And basturma is essentially dry cured beef with a fenugreek, garlic, paprika and cumin rub. 

So, I picked up a tremendous saison beer to go along with it. I made a grilled cheese, fried some eggs, and put on David Chang’s PBS show. 

I’ve determined the only thing that can distract me from cooking is cooking something else. I guess I’ll have to prep for my gig tomorrow.

True story, fake name

Marbles, mulberries, her breasts and the last summer of my childhood

 

The summer of 1992 was a special one – I was eight years old. I can’t fathom how I fit so much indulgence and exploration into one summer. I went foraging with my aunt for wild fennel, oregano, and nettles. I had figs, fried mussels, and kokoretsi for the first time in my life – all on my own dime. Now, before I start talking about mulberries let me tell you something about Turkish figs, they are a miracle of cultivation and artificial selection. At the height of the season, they come fist-sized, green on the outside and ruby-red with yellow seeds on the inside. They’re perhaps better than mulberries – I’ve often thought what my life would be like if it was a fig tree instead of a mulberry tree that I climbed that afternoon. Fig trees are not fun to climb.

It was the summer before I started studying for the infamous Turkish middle school entry exams. My last worry-free summer…

Read the rest of the story here.