Basic dry cured, smoked bacon.

Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

sayattheexplorer:

mytinybluedot replied to your photo “Bacon selfie! (Somewhat) fresh out of the smoker cured with fennel,…”
So you seriously can not post a pic like that and not share the recipe.
Did you want the recipe for the bacon or the angry cook?

Alright, it’s definitely a process and needs attention but once you get the basics of bacon making down, you can make it every three months and never have to buy bacon again. 

Here are the basics for dry curing bacon: 

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OIive leaf smoked castelvetrano and kalamata olives with olive leaf pasta
When you make this dish, the olive leaf smoke will permeate your house in the most pleasant way. My family in Istanbul has always used olive leaves for incense and I’m incorporating this incredible smell into a simple pasta dish, in which Italian and Greek ingredients meet for a date in Istanbul. 
3 oz olive leaf smoked olives (here for DIY instr.), 1 oz slized, 2 oz whole; 5 chiffonade purple basil; 1/2 minced garlic clove; 4 T EVOO; 3 anchovies fillets, minced; 1 T chevre; pinch of crushed Aleppo peppers; kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste; 4 cups al dente cooked foglie d’ulivo pasta
In a small stainless steel skillet, bring 4 T of EV olive oil to temperature and add the whole smoked olives and the minced anchovies. When the anchovies are fragrant, add the garlic, pinch of Aleppo peppers and the sliced olives. Add the pasta with some of the reserved cooking liquid and toss in the skillet to incorporate. Finish with the chevre and incorporate into a uniform texture. Season with salt and fresh ground black pepper. Serve warm. High-res

OIive leaf smoked castelvetrano and kalamata olives with olive leaf pasta

When you make this dish, the olive leaf smoke will permeate your house in the most pleasant way. My family in Istanbul has always used olive leaves for incense and I’m incorporating this incredible smell into a simple pasta dish, in which Italian and Greek ingredients meet for a date in Istanbul. 

3 oz olive leaf smoked olives (here for DIY instr.), 1 oz slized, 2 oz whole; 5 chiffonade purple basil; 1/2 minced garlic clove; 4 T EVOO; 3 anchovies fillets, minced; 1 T chevre; pinch of crushed Aleppo peppers; kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste; 4 cups al dente cooked foglie d’ulivo pasta

In a small stainless steel skillet, bring 4 T of EV olive oil to temperature and add the whole smoked olives and the minced anchovies. When the anchovies are fragrant, add the garlic, pinch of Aleppo peppers and the sliced olives. Add the pasta with some of the reserved cooking liquid and toss in the skillet to incorporate. Finish with the chevre and incorporate into a uniform texture. Season with salt and fresh ground black pepper. Serve warm.

It’s incredibly simple to create a smoking contraption in your home kitchen. In this scenario, I heated up my cast iron skilled on high heat — enough that as soon as the leaves touched the surface, they started emanating their wonderful aroma. Then I crushed the leaves and scattered them in the skillet. 
The olives are sitting in plate made out of foil, which itself is sitting on a piece of folded aluminum to elevate it from the skillet. 
Then I covered the entire pan with foil to trap the smoke. I turned off my heat and held the skillet on the stove top using the residual heat on the stove as well as the skillet. I left it covered for 20 minutes before I tasted the olives for the first time. They were great, not to smoky but certainly olive-leafy, which is exactly what I was going for. 
You can play with the amount of leaves, how crushed they are, and how long you’re going to keep your smoking contraption covered, depending on the amount of smoke you wish the infuse your ingredients with!  High-res

It’s incredibly simple to create a smoking contraption in your home kitchen. In this scenario, I heated up my cast iron skilled on high heat — enough that as soon as the leaves touched the surface, they started emanating their wonderful aroma. Then I crushed the leaves and scattered them in the skillet. 

The olives are sitting in plate made out of foil, which itself is sitting on a piece of folded aluminum to elevate it from the skillet. 

Then I covered the entire pan with foil to trap the smoke. I turned off my heat and held the skillet on the stove top using the residual heat on the stove as well as the skillet. I left it covered for 20 minutes before I tasted the olives for the first time. They were great, not to smoky but certainly olive-leafy, which is exactly what I was going for. 

You can play with the amount of leaves, how crushed they are, and how long you’re going to keep your smoking contraption covered, depending on the amount of smoke you wish the infuse your ingredients with! 

Wild boar and Kielbasa stew with IPA braised cabbage, potato pierogies and sour cream! Last day of class at the Culinary before starting work at Blue Hill at Stone Barns (at Culinary Institute Of America)
When I saw the “open entree” on the schedule for my last day, I wanted to go Moroccan with quince, pomegranates,  pumpkins, Romano beans, preserved lemons and couscous. Braise some lamb and call it a day. Voila a fantastically flavorful tagine. Also, that sounds like a great idea for another post. Stay tuned! 
Chef had different plans — we were handed down a lot of Kielbasa from the Guard Manger class. What a delight I thought. I’ll go to Poland. 
There is a Polish hunter stew called bigos. And you know what, with the hunting season in NY approaching the end, it is the perfect time to honor the hunter. I never made this stew before but I made something very similar whenever I had sour Belgian ales and some stewing meat — Carbonade Flamande, a Flemmish beer bœuf bourguignon.
My partner Gavin and I ordered 20 lbs of wild boar shoulder and leg, 10 giant heads of cabbage, nine 330 ml bottles of IPAs, and 6 quarts of veal stock. We used a cup of pepper paste, 20 cloves of garlic, 20 large onions for our aromatics. 
At the end, we sold 75 plates — a fantastic number for an entree sold in the high volume production kitchen at the Culinary Institute of America.  High-res

Wild boar and Kielbasa stew with IPA braised cabbage, potato pierogies and sour cream! Last day of class at the Culinary before starting work at Blue Hill at Stone Barns (at Culinary Institute Of America)

When I saw the “open entree” on the schedule for my last day, I wanted to go Moroccan with quince, pomegranates,  pumpkins, Romano beans, preserved lemons and couscous. Braise some lamb and call it a day. Voila a fantastically flavorful tagine. Also, that sounds like a great idea for another post. Stay tuned! 

Chef had different plans — we were handed down a lot of Kielbasa from the Guard Manger class. What a delight I thought. I’ll go to Poland. 

There is a Polish hunter stew called bigos. And you know what, with the hunting season in NY approaching the end, it is the perfect time to honor the hunter. I never made this stew before but I made something very similar whenever I had sour Belgian ales and some stewing meat — Carbonade Flamande, a Flemmish beer bœuf bourguignon.

My partner Gavin and I ordered 20 lbs of wild boar shoulder and leg, 10 giant heads of cabbage, nine 330 ml bottles of IPAs, and 6 quarts of veal stock. We used a cup of pepper paste, 20 cloves of garlic, 20 large onions for our aromatics. 

At the end, we sold 75 plates — a fantastic number for an entree sold in the high volume production kitchen at the Culinary Institute of America. 

For breakfast class at the CIA, we create our own specials in addition to regular menu items. I was on egg station on our last day. I looked in my pantry, found some mirin, shoyu and Korean pepper paste. Whisked it all up to make a base. Sliced some scallions. Made an omelette. Topped it with bonito flakes in the okonomiyaki tradition.

One of the most fun experiences — to watch your food dance in front of you. 

The rising steam moves the bonito flakes… and that helped me sell the most breakfast items that morning! 

It all started with a duck breast. I built the plate around it with ingredients I’ve wanted to work with. Nasturtium, pickled banana flowers, baby Japanese eggplants from the school garden, mirin, wasabi powder… 

Let’s start with the protein. I scored the duck — oh, also, this is my first time cooking a duck breast. Yes, I know, it’s weird. 

I placed fat side down on a cold skillet and rendered the fat, reserving it in another container as necessary. My cross mark got crispy, the fat layer got thin and I removed the duck from the pan to hold. Later when everything else was ready, I finished the other side in a hot pan with a little bit of the duck fat and seasoning. I sliced it thin, fanned it and put it on top of my sauce. I finished it with additional sauce on top as well. 

For the sauce, I sauted shallots, carrots, and ginger until I developed sufficient color and flavor. I added a T of my white miso, a T of mirin, the juice of an orange and a half a cup of brown duck stock, which I luckily had in my inventory. I strained and reduced to thin nappe without a thickener. 

For the carbohydrate, I toasted a cup of barley. Then I soaked it — though not sufficiently, I only soaked it for an hour. Then I simmered it for two hours in three quarts of shiitake stem and ginger broth. Once al dente, I cooled it and finished with mirin, wasabi powder, and chives. The deep mushroom flavor, the sweetness of the mirin, and the mustardy heat of the wasabi worked well with the texture of the barley, though I would have preferred soba noodles.

The eggplant, the mushrooms, and the banana flower were seared in sesame oil and finished in a miso, shoyu, mirin and Thai bird chili glaze.

Nasturtium flowers were stuffed with a strawberry (from the school garden), cilantro, labnah (I needed something to bring the stuffing together and not fall out of the flower), and chili oil stuffing. They were then dipped in tempura batter and deep fried. The tempura batter needs work and that’s why I’m not going into the details. The stuffing worked wonders although the flowers were stuffed in minute amounts.  

I think the plating needs work. Some of the glaze should have gone on the plate along with the vegetables. The plate looks too sterile without the duck sauce as well as the glaze visible in the photo. And the inclusion of the banana flower is purely whimsical. 

Overall — three hours of work, lots of trial and error, well worth it.

Such a luxury to cook for yourself! Fresh and blistered heirlooms with Roquefort, arugula, sumac and EV olive oil fried eggs, crostini and cornichons (at Culinary Institute Of America) High-res

Such a luxury to cook for yourself! Fresh and blistered heirlooms with Roquefort, arugula, sumac and EV olive oil fried eggs, crostini and cornichons (at Culinary Institute Of America)

My kitchen partner Brittany’s brainchild! Butternut squash, porcini and ricotta stuffed ravioli with brown butter sauce, garnished with chanterelles, roasted squash, sage leaves and seeds High-res

My kitchen partner Brittany’s brainchild! Butternut squash, porcini and ricotta stuffed ravioli with brown butter sauce, garnished with chanterelles, roasted squash, sage leaves and seeds

Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

sayattheexplorer:

Singapore rice noodles: 

This is my first interpretation of a classic Chinese takeout. A couple additions include Chayote squash, baby bok choy and shallots. 

Make a paste with garlic, ginger, shallots, salt, red pepper flakes, curry, turmeric and ground cloves. Boil the chayote ahead of time. Julienne peppers, onions, and chayote. Diagonal cut bok choy and leak. Soak the rice noodles in water that has come to a boil. Time the next steps according to your liking but have your entire station ready ahead of time. Heat up oil in wok until you see smoke. Throw in onions and leaks with the paste. Let the pan come back up to temp and add the rest of the vegetables. Let the pan come back up to temp and add the rice noodles after draining them as much as possible. Fry for another three to four minutes and dish out. Add fried egg and dig in! 

My partner and myself made this today for our vegetarian entre!

Black lentil dal with homemade paneer, toasted papad, lime and amla pickles, jeera and mint rice, veg entre of the day (at Culinary Institute Of America). My teammate and myself whipped this up in 45 minutes. Papad and the pickles are store bought. Papad was roasted on the grill. 
We reserved the whey from the paneer and made a vegetable stock with it. Cooked the lentils in the whey — gave it a tangy profile. We used South Indian spices in this dal, though we used urad dal. Curry leaves, kasthuri methi, jeera, mustard seeds, ajwain, mirch, coriander, turmeric and garlic / ginger / onions. 
We deep fried the paneer for color and texture, and seasoned it before adding to the lentils. 
The rice was cooked in a vegetable stock and finished with butter, toasted cumin, cilantro and mint. 
It was a good day!  High-res

Black lentil dal with homemade paneer, toasted papad, lime and amla pickles, jeera and mint rice, veg entre of the day (at Culinary Institute Of America). My teammate and myself whipped this up in 45 minutes. Papad and the pickles are store bought. Papad was roasted on the grill. 

We reserved the whey from the paneer and made a vegetable stock with it. Cooked the lentils in the whey — gave it a tangy profile. We used South Indian spices in this dal, though we used urad dal. Curry leaves, kasthuri methi, jeera, mustard seeds, ajwain, mirch, coriander, turmeric and garlic / ginger / onions. 

We deep fried the paneer for color and texture, and seasoned it before adding to the lentils. 

The rice was cooked in a vegetable stock and finished with butter, toasted cumin, cilantro and mint. 

It was a good day!