sayattheexplorer:

Olympia is an iconic joint for Mumbaikar. At breakfast they serve the famous keema, a minced mutton fry with vatana or green peas and masala that is spiked with green chilis and whole spices. It’s served with white bread usually. 
I like mine on a two egg omellete with chapati. It was my favorite breakfast during my tandoor days in Mumbai. Also, if you get lucky, you’ll coincide with buffalo milk chai. They don’t have this all the time but when they do, it’s a delight.
Olympia, Colaba, Mumbai

Ok, I love going to culinary school, cooking on weekends at an excellent restaurant and working for the CIA’s test kitchen but I cannot wait to travel again. Some plans are forming in my head… I clove developing new habits that were completely foreign before exposing myself to them! I miss Olympia, I miss chai. High-res

Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

sayattheexplorer:

Olympia is an iconic joint for Mumbaikar. At breakfast they serve the famous keema, a minced mutton fry with vatana or green peas and masala that is spiked with green chilis and whole spices. It’s served with white bread usually. 

I like mine on a two egg omellete with chapati. It was my favorite breakfast during my tandoor days in Mumbai. Also, if you get lucky, you’ll coincide with buffalo milk chai. They don’t have this all the time but when they do, it’s a delight.

Olympia, Colaba, Mumbai

Ok, I love going to culinary school, cooking on weekends at an excellent restaurant and working for the CIA’s test kitchen but I cannot wait to travel again. Some plans are forming in my head… I clove developing new habits that were completely foreign before exposing myself to them! I miss Olympia, I miss chai.

Bangkok, this is no goodbye!

Having been on the move for most of the last 10 years, I always found myself in situations where I had to move on before my feelings for someone were ready to do so. I’ve often revisited relationships on a continuum. I recognize that this can be emotionally taxing sometimes and that it always requires what I call ‘emotional flexibility’.

After a couple cups of chai at the Chennai Airport with fellow travelers, I Armenianed (i.e. ‘Jewed’) down the price of the tuk tuk to the bus terminal. Of course, he took me to a spot a mile away on the same route as the buses to Pondicherry. All the while, I was negotiating the price for a 6 mile distance. After drinking a couple more chais with the tuk tuk driver’s son and friend, I finally got on the bus with the bright moon.

The ECR (East Coast Road) is beautiful — Pondicherry is a straight shot from Chennai, no windy roads. Unlike the mountainous Mumbai - Goa route. 

Everyone was asleep and the windows were open when I got on the bus. The ocean shimmering between the trees, the strong wind, and the moonlight, made me feel as though I was on a late night boat in Istanbul, a sensation that I often try to rejoice whereever I can. That’s why late night commutes in Mumbai from the restaurant were no bother! 

As I was going through all this in my head, I realized my relationship with Bangkok was such a love affair, one that will continue when paths cross again. Great preperations, unique flavors, fresh and fermened ingredients, and people passionate about food… Yes, Bangkok, this is no goodbye. 

Here is my reading list for the next month of travel!

Thanks to e-books and audioboos — traveling and reading is so easy! I cannot wait for the reading and adventures to begin!

  • Escoffier’s Ma Cuisine (I think this one will be more along the lines of figuring out the general content of the 900 page book)
  • Jack McInerney’s most recent book on wine: The Juice: Vinious Veritas
  • Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors (almost done)
  • A couple Indian cookbooks
  • How I learned to Cook: Culinary Educations from the World’s Greatest Chefs
  • 2nd time Harold McGee’s On Food and Cooking
  • Heston Blumenthal’s Biography
  • Au Revoir to All That: Food, Wine and the End of France