Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

sayattheexplorer:

Cooking up the Rhinebeck Farmers Market (Rhinebeck, NY)

A Hudson red salad with cherries, sour cherry vinaigrette, fried quail eggs and toasted pine nuts

The Hudson red is a rind-ripened raw milk cheese reminiscent of the Italian Taleggio even more pungent in its odor and just as mild in its flavor. The bloom on the rind is an iridescent red and yellow with a thicker texture than Taleggio. It’s sweet with fruity undertones behind the pungent cheesiness. 

The yogurt bread is from a dear baking student at the Culinary, the greens are from my chef’s farm, the nuts are from our product knowledge class and the cherries and the cheese are from the market. 

For the sour cherry vinaigrette: Remove the pits of one cup of cherries, blend in blender until smooth. Add a teaspoon of honey. Check tartness and add lemon or lime juice if necessary. Add 1/3 by volume olive oil and season dressing. 

The sour cherries were not as sour as they can be. The season has been very rainy here in NY and the flavor has been diluted in a lot of fruits in the area. 

sayattheexplorer:

OIive leaf smoked castelvetrano and kalamata olives with olive leaf pasta
When you make this dish, the olive leaf smoke will permeate your house in the most pleasant way. My family in Istanbul has always used olive leaves for incense and I’m incorporating this incredible smell into a simple pasta dish, in which Italian and Greek ingredients meet for a date in Istanbul. 
3 oz olive leaf smoked olives (here for DIY instr.), 1 oz slized, 2 oz whole; 5 chiffonade purple basil; 1/2 minced garlic clove; 4 T EVOO; 3 anchovies fillets, minced; 1 T chevre; pinch of crushed Aleppo peppers; kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste; 4 cups al dente cooked foglie d’ulivo pasta
In a small stainless steel skillet, bring 4 T of EV olive oil to temperature and add the whole smoked olives and the minced anchovies. When the anchovies are fragrant, add the garlic, pinch of Aleppo peppers and the sliced olives. Add the pasta with some of the reserved cooking liquid and toss in the skillet to incorporate. Finish with the chevre and incorporate into a uniform texture. Season with salt and fresh ground black pepper. Serve warm. High-res

Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

sayattheexplorer:

OIive leaf smoked castelvetrano and kalamata olives with olive leaf pasta

When you make this dish, the olive leaf smoke will permeate your house in the most pleasant way. My family in Istanbul has always used olive leaves for incense and I’m incorporating this incredible smell into a simple pasta dish, in which Italian and Greek ingredients meet for a date in Istanbul. 

3 oz olive leaf smoked olives (here for DIY instr.), 1 oz slized, 2 oz whole; 5 chiffonade purple basil; 1/2 minced garlic clove; 4 T EVOO; 3 anchovies fillets, minced; 1 T chevre; pinch of crushed Aleppo peppers; kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste; 4 cups al dente cooked foglie d’ulivo pasta

In a small stainless steel skillet, bring 4 T of EV olive oil to temperature and add the whole smoked olives and the minced anchovies. When the anchovies are fragrant, add the garlic, pinch of Aleppo peppers and the sliced olives. Add the pasta with some of the reserved cooking liquid and toss in the skillet to incorporate. Finish with the chevre and incorporate into a uniform texture. Season with salt and fresh ground black pepper. Serve warm.

sayattheexplorer:

I was playing with fava beans, then I made this: Green fava hummus with dill, pistachios and fruity extra virgin olive oil. 
Ingredients: 
1/2 lb of peeled fava beans
2 T extra virgin olive oil (fruity preferred)
1 T peeled chopped pistachios
2 T picked and chopped dill or mint
1 T picked parsley
3 cloves roasted or confit garlic (sub 1 clove minced garlic)
1-2 oz lemon juice (to taste)
sea salt and fresh ground white pepper to taste






 Instructions:
 Blanch fava beans for one minute in seasoned water, shock in ice bath immediately
Combine beans, garlic, half of the lemon juice, pistachios and herbs, and incorporate in a blender
Season lightly with salt and pepper, and on low speed emulsify the extra virgin olive oil into the mixture
Finish seasoning with the remaining lemon juice, and salt and fresh ground white pepper

 Note: You can adjust consistency with additional olive oil or water High-res

Sayat Explores FoodReblogged from Sayat Explores Food

sayattheexplorer:

I was playing with fava beans, then I made this: Green fava hummus with dill, pistachios and fruity extra virgin olive oil. 

Ingredients: 

  • 1/2 lb of peeled fava beans
  • 2 T extra virgin olive oil (fruity preferred)
  • 1 T peeled chopped pistachios
  • 2 T picked and chopped dill or mint
  • 1 T picked parsley
  • 3 cloves roasted or confit garlic (sub 1 clove minced garlic)
  • 1-2 oz lemon juice (to taste)
  • sea salt and fresh ground white pepper to taste

 Instructions:

  1.  Blanch fava beans for one minute in seasoned water, shock in ice bath immediately
  2. Combine beans, garlic, half of the lemon juice, pistachios and herbs, and incorporate in a blender
  3. Season lightly with salt and pepper, and on low speed emulsify the extra virgin olive oil into the mixture
  4. Finish seasoning with the remaining lemon juice, and salt and fresh ground white pepper

 Note: You can adjust consistency with additional olive oil or water

Last night in Istanbul

After an amazing day with family, I’m ready to come back to NY. Currently listening to Snap Judgement on NPR. I feel peaceful and excited. 

I feel more torn between two homes than I’ve ever had in the last ten years. 

I was playing with fava beans, then I made this: Green fava hummus with dill, pistachios and fruity extra virgin olive oil. 
Ingredients: 
1/2 lb of peeled fava beans
2 T extra virgin olive oil (fruity preferred)
1 T peeled chopped pistachios
2 T picked and chopped dill or mint
1 T picked parsley
3 cloves roasted or confit garlic (sub 1 clove minced garlic)
1-2 oz lemon juice (to taste)
sea salt and fresh ground white pepper to taste







 Instructions:
 Blanch fava beans for one minute in seasoned water, shock in ice bath immediately
Combine beans, garlic, half of the lemon juice, pistachios and herbs, and incorporate in a blender
Season lightly with salt and pepper, and on low speed emulsify the extra virgin olive oil into the mixture
Finish seasoning with the remaining lemon juice, and salt and fresh ground white pepper


 Note: You can adjust consistency with additional olive oil or water High-res

I was playing with fava beans, then I made this: Green fava hummus with dill, pistachios and fruity extra virgin olive oil. 

Ingredients: 

  • 1/2 lb of peeled fava beans
  • 2 T extra virgin olive oil (fruity preferred)
  • 1 T peeled chopped pistachios
  • 2 T picked and chopped dill or mint
  • 1 T picked parsley
  • 3 cloves roasted or confit garlic (sub 1 clove minced garlic)
  • 1-2 oz lemon juice (to taste)
  • sea salt and fresh ground white pepper to taste

 Instructions:

  1.  Blanch fava beans for one minute in seasoned water, shock in ice bath immediately
  2. Combine beans, garlic, half of the lemon juice, pistachios and herbs, and incorporate in a blender
  3. Season lightly with salt and pepper, and on low speed emulsify the extra virgin olive oil into the mixture
  4. Finish seasoning with the remaining lemon juice, and salt and fresh ground white pepper

 Note: You can adjust consistency with additional olive oil or water

Uyghurs comprise a small minority in Istanbul — with large enough of an appetite to warrant a dozen restaurants in the business districts of the old town, Aksaray and Eminonu. I walked into one and sat down with two students who came to Istanbul to study architecture. 

I’m talking about the cuisine of the disputed Xinjiang cuisine. The fusion of Turkic and Islamic tendencies and Chinese preparations.

Lagmen was the main attraction for my young friends — kaurma or kavurma with lagmen, aka. stir fried beef and vegetables with lo mein noodles. The noodles were made daily, in small batches in a similar technique to ramen noodles by pulling and stretching. Flour and water are the only ingredients in the noddles for the lagmen dish. A mildly spicy red pepper paste from the Xinjiang province and a barley vinegar were the main drivers of flavor in the stir fry. 

The dumplings are referred to as manti, which is the same word for little Turkish dumplings. The Uyghur version is prepared in the Northern Chinese tradition in terms of size. To meet Muslim needs, it was stuffed with a rich (with suet), hand-chopped beef stuffing rather than the ubiquitous and less expensive pork in Chinese preparations.

Simple, soulful and delicious. 

The soup was a thick beef broth with the pepper paste, romano beans, spinach and hand chopped noodles. 

There cold noodle salad was a curious preparation. The egg noodles were thick and chewy but also succulent submerged in the cold pepper broth and tossed with cucumbers to reminisce a salad with cukes and kimchi. 

What I noticed with the kebob was the use of suet. Health conscious Istanbulites prefer their kebobs leaner and therefore you don’t get too much beef fat in your kebobs. No fat, no flavor. But the Uyghurs are better than that. 

I would go back to eat Uyghur food any time!